Category Archives: earpiece

earpiece

What is an Acoustic Transducer?

So i found this post on the net and i understand that just posting it as the whole piece is not the right thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up the way to curate content, so this is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the industry.

An acoustic transducer is an electrical device that coverts sound wave vibrations into mechanical or electrical energy. They have various practical applications, including sound recording and sound playback. A specialized model, called an ultrasonic acoustic transducer, can be used to measure distance to, as well as the mass of, an object.

Common types of acoustic transducers used in sound recording include microphones, earphones, and guitar pickups. These create electrical energy when moving parts inside the transducer, such as electrical plates or ribbons, are exposed to sound vibrations. The electrical energy produced inside the transducer is sent first to an amplifier.

The amplifier then sends this energy to its final destination, usually a loudspeaker or recording device. The loudspeaker reproduces the sound at a level that the human ear can hear. A recording device will retain the electrical signal information. The recorder will send the stored signal to a loudspeaker during playback.

An ultrasonic acoustic transducer can be used to measure distance or the mass of an object. The most common type is the piezoelectric acoustic transducer. These include a piezoelectric ceramic element that creates and distributes ultrasonic sound waves.

Sound waves travel to an object from a piezoelectric transducer through material called a couplant. The couplant is usually water. Sound waves bounce off the object and return to the transducer in the form of an echo. The time it takes for these echoes to return to the transducer is used to calculate the distance to the object.

Underwater sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) is a common use of an ultrasonic acoustic transducer. SONAR uses directional beams of sound waves. This enables the SONAR operator to determine the direction and distance to an object.

SONAR systems can be active or passive. An active system sends out sound waves and listens for echoes. A passive system listens for noises made by ships, fish, and landmasses.

An electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) is another form of ultrasonic transducer. Instead of a ceramic element, an electro magnet is the main component of an EMAT. This is a type of non-contact, or non-destructive transducer. Unlike piezoelectric transducers, EMATs do not need a couplant to carry sound waves. Instead, two electromagnetic fields are generated to disburse ultrasonic waves.

EMATs can easily be used almost anywhere since no liquid is needed. For example, EMATs can be used to check for flaws in underground pipes. A downside to EMATs, compared to piezoelectric transducers, is that EMATs create weaker sound fields.

 

How To Put On An Earpiece And Walkie-Talkie?

Pete’s question may seem obvious, but it is actually a perfectly reasonable thing to ask. Besides, Pete’s email was long, detailed and impeccably polite. I like Pete. I dig Pete (HUR HUR HUR – Sorry Pete, that one couldn’t be helped).

Anyway, Pete wanted a step-by-step guide to putting on a radio earpiece. It is actually ridiculously easy to get tangled up in the wires (which, as I told one curious soul back in March last year, has something to do with the randomness of the universe). In any instance, I decided that others might have experienced the same problems as Pete, so I thought it best to acquiesce and write this guide.

OK Pete, the first thing to do is take the clippable (which, according to my spellchecker isn’t a word, but bear with me anyway) microphone and attach it somewhere on your person where it can pick up your voice without too much difficulty (a tie would be a great place).

Next, attach the earpiece to your ear. It goes on the same way your headphones do, you may have to toggle it until it is comfortable, but that’s all part of the fun! Put it through your shirt so you don’t have cables hanging out everywhere.

At this point, you might as well turn the radio on. It’ll be easier to do now than when it is clipped to the back of your belt.

Then, you take the remaining piece of wire (the bit dangling down from the clippable mic) and loop it through your shirt so that it comes out of the back. You then take the radio itself, slap the plug into it and attach the radio to your belt behind you (or wherever you plan on attaching it).

To operate the radio, you have to use the PTT (Push To Talk) function on the mic. You do this by simply pushing the button and talking.

In most cases, the other radio functions (whatever they may be) will have to be performed after removing the radio from your belt (unless, of course, you happen to be some kind of contortionist, in which case: go nuts with different body combinations and freak random people out as you go).

I hope that answered your question, Pete. Have fun using your radio!

How To Put On A Security Earpiece

Radio earpieces look really cool. They are generally used for surveillance but some enthusiasts also wear them just for fun. Secret agents and spies in the movies have made these accessories really cool to wear.

Putting on a radio earpiece is not a tough job. To put on an earpiece, first of all you need to take that earpiece and microphone clip in your hand. The microphone is to be put where you are most comfortable with it. It can be put on your hands, specifically on your wrist. You must have seen Spies or Secret Service agents in movies lifting their wrists talk. This is where they are speaking into the mouthpiece on their wrists.

If you’re not comfortable with the mouthpiece on the wrist, you can also put it on the tie or on the shirt, on your chest. Once you have clipped on the mouthpiece, it is time to put on the radio. Take the wire dangling from the mouthpiece and put it inside your shirt. Take this wire out from the top of the shirt. This way the dangling wires will be completely hidden. Take the earpiece and put it on your ears. Make sure, that it fits tightly and would not fall off when you start to walk. You can put it on either ear. If you are wearing the mouthpiece on the wrist, you will find it comfortable to put the earpiece on the same side ear.

Once you are comfortable with the mouthpiece and the earpiece, it is the turn of the end which goes into the radio. Take this dangling wire connecting that end with earpiece and mouthpiece and put it inside your shirt. Take out the wire from the bottom of the shirt. Put it in the radio and clip the radio in its place on your pants. Once you have that these wires inside your shirt completely, you need to tuck in your shirt inside your pants so that none of the wires are visible.

Once everything is fixed, switch on the said radio and test the settings. If everything is working as it should be then you have put on the radio earpiece correctly.

Wait, you are not done yet!

Once you have tucked in your shirt inside your pants and put on your jacket, you need to test the comfort level of this piece by walking around a few paces up and down. If you’re comfortable with the earpiece and the mouthpiece and are able to talk on radio, then you are set for the job. If any of the wires are the earpiece or the mouthpiece is making you uncomfortable, you need to reset your wires.

The real advantage of a concealed earpiece is that others wouldn’t notice when you are talking on a concealed earpiece. If you’re uncomfortable wearing these or with the wires, you lose the advantage of a hidden radio earpiece. Therefore it is very important to check the complete settings by walking around.

Congratulations, you have successfully put on a radio earpiece. Now, enjoy talking like a secret service agent.

The earpieces described in this article can be found at EarpieceOnline.co.uk

The headphones revolution: bright colours, street styling spark new craze

Anyone considering buying headphones for a young relative this Christmas, take care before splashing out the £150 or more that the most fashionable – the Beats, or Skullcandy, or Urbanears models – can cost.

Each brand marks them out as one of a “tribe”, regardless of sound quality. Whereas 20 years ago the most important thing for a teenager was the brand of trainer on their feet – Nike, Reebok or Adidas – now it’s the brand covering their ears that matters.

Beats headphones, with their red cord and large “b” on the earpieces, began appearing in music videos in late 2008, largely through the efforts of the company’s co-founders, the rapper Dr Dre and the music entrepreneur Jimmy Iovine. That sparked rocketing sales to a teenage demographic looking for a new way to distinguish themselves out from their peers.

In doing so, Beats’ emergence showed that high-priced headphones would sell, becoming as much a fashion accessory as a gadget, commanding prices over £200 – a bracket previously reserved for the audiophile niche.

A decade ago, the white tendrils of an iPod’s headphones might have marked the wearer out as trendy; nowadays it makes them just one of the crowd, and Apple’s in-ear headphones are too common to bother with. A teenager wanting to stand out needs something big – and bold.

“Companies like Beats and Skullcandy have realised that kids today want something that looks better, over questions of sound quality,” says Sam Ruffe, who works at The Kinc, a marketing agency whose clients include Skullcandy.

And those kids (or their parents) will pay: worldwide, the market for headphones will be worth over £5bn ($8bn) this year, with 284m units shipped, according to the consumer consultancy Futuresource; over-ear headphones grabbed half of sales. And Beats alone will grab around £1.25bn – while the total market is forecast to grow by 5% annually for the next five years.

Skullcandy was originally designed for skiers and snowboarders, by Rick Alden, who got the idea on a chairlift in Park City, Utah. Starting in 2003, he managed to persuade skating and skiing shops to stock the product, which became known as an “extreme sports” brand.

Urbanears, meanwhile, brought Scandinavian design and a flourish of colour to the burgeoning headphone market, releasing two “collections” of headphones a year in limited-edition colours.

The continued success of Beats brought competition as these other brands began chasing the new demographic of people willing to spend money to wear their branding choice on their ears. Skullcandy moved off the slopes and into the high street. Now, they are more likely to be seen on the bus than on the piste.

Audiophiles aren’t impressed by the brigade of bolshy Beats products, which often pride bass and look over acoustic refinement. “I just bought a set of the Beats Solo HD headphones – it’s a Christmas gift for my 13-year-old daughter,” Chris Miller, a software engineer, told the Guardian, adding: “I think they are overpriced and you are paying a premium for the brand name. They aren’t bad, but I have headphones that sound better for half the price that I paid for the Beats.”

Sound quality, though, isn’t necessarily the point – which may have been missed by more traditional “audiophile” brands such as Germany’s Sennheiser, the Dutch brand Philips and the American Bose, who were caught unaware that colouring the earpiece and cord green or red could affect sales as much as their sound quality.

Andy Watson of Futuresource says you might struggle to tell some headphones apart at the factory. “With everyone owning the same generic-looking personal audio player or mobile phone, it’s the headphones that do the differentiating. There is certainly cachet and brand equity attached to many of the brands, beyond their intrinsic value. Much of it is about positioning a lifestyle rather than a product.”

Yet the growing tribalism of headphone ownership has led to derision in some quarters – such as the blog “Long Way From Compton”, which features pictures of people wearing Beats headphones, and measuring the distance from there to the notorious gang-ridden Los Angeles district from which Dr Dre emerged.

It’s in the can

Beats Studio

Arguably one of the headphones that kicked off the large and colourful trend, the original Beats by Dre headphones drove appeal through product placement in music videos. Pushed by the music marketing powerhouse of Dr Dre (pictured above) and Jimmy Iovine, Beats brought big, aggressive bass-y sound at a big price and made it fashionable.

Bowers & Wilkins P5

Proving that expensive, fashionable headphones could sound good, the Bowers & Wilkins P5 ooze luxury and sound great, with excellent noise isolation and good range, which makes the equally pricey Beats sound downright mediocre.

Bose QuietComfort

The commuter’s favourite, Bose took noise-cancelling technology – which silences the outside world by blasting sound waves to cancel out the noise leaving only the music audible – and made it popular. On their third revision, the Bose QuietComforts are still the active noise-cancelling headphones to beat for many.

Sennheiser Momentum

Long-standing quality audio company Sennheiser was late to the stylish headphone game, but its Momentum series combines a sophisticated look with top-notch acoustics.

Starck

A collaboration between the French designer Philippe Starck and the Bluetooth specialists Parrot, Zik headphones are some of the best wireless headphones around, with intuitive touch controls, active noise-cancelling, and sound profiles and acoustics that can be modified with iPhone and Android apps.

Skullcandy Crusher

Battery-powered bass means that the Crusher gives real wallop to what otherwise might just be loud music. Cavernous earpieces (made of “soft touch” leather) also come with a powered mini-amplifier, foldable hinge (for storage) and a microphone and remote on the detachable headphone cable. CA and SG

Source – http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/dec/06/headphones-market-beats-by-dre

Will I be Able to Hear Bone Conduction Headphones Even if I Wear Earplugs?

Because bone conduction bypasses the ear entirely and directly stimulates the ossicles (which is the scientific name for the tiny bones that reside in your inner ear, as well as the rationale behind comic book hero Daredevil’s athletic prowess), it is entirely possible to stick your ear plugs in and still listen to your ‘Bonephones’.

 

In some respects, it’s actually preferable. Y’see Nick, using headphones is fine and dandy, until you have to turn the volume all the way up in order to drown out noisy children, busy traffic and/or people shouting into their phones all around you. After that, if you increase the volume to too great a degree, you can expose your ears to sounds that can actually permanently damage your hearing. Continue reading

One of the earphones has stopped working, why?

There are many reasons for this widespread (yet absurdly annoying) occurrence. Generally, however, it’s basically due to a loose wire and can often be fixed by pushing the wire towards the earpiece and, if needs be, fixing it into position with a bit of electrical tape, super glue, or other adhesive.

Now and again, if the headphones have an inline volume turn, that can be the reason. That one is slightly difficult to fix, but you could always try the ‘wire trick’ outlined above and see if it works. If not, then open the volume controls and re-solder the cables into place (be warned, this may invalidate most warranties, so if the ‘phones are still covered, just send ‘em back and find replacements).  Continue reading

An earpiece of the action

What will you do if i said I had found a earpiece article that isn’t only fascinating but educational as well? I knew you wouldn’t believe me, so here it is the enlightening, excellent and fascinating article

Now for those of you who have been regular readers and posters on here, you’ll know what this blog is all about. If you’re new, let me explain.

I noticed someone last week asking on here why didn’t I write about the latest political goings-on. Well my take on that question is that there are a million websites, many of them excellent, where you can read up on that stuff and other people do it on the BBC F1 site; whereas this is the only place that, I hope, gives you unique access to what doing my job is like. Continue reading

What police earpieces are available to civilians

There are quite a few police earpieces on the market right now, Renée, so the high likelihood is that whatever you need, someone, somewhere will be selling it. If it helps, I’ll give you a bit of an overview…

If you’re in the market for an overt earpiece, or even if you fancy something a bit more discreet (like, um, a covert earpiece), you’ll certainly be able to find it on the World Wide Web. Police organizations across the world employ a wide variety of communications equipment, from ‘listen only’ devices to PTT (Push To Talk) earpieces and, as I said, a significant portion of that equipment is available for consumer purchase. Continue reading

How Large are the Batteries in a Typical Bluetooth Earpiece?

The size of the battery actually depends on the Bluetooth earpiece. Some of the more basic earpiece models run on a single AAA battery, the kind that you can find in any shop. Others, however, operate on a Lithium Ion Polymer battery. This battery is usually just a little smaller than the main body of the earpiece itself.

The battery is often (but not always, as you will read below) small enough to fit inside the earpiece itself, so they tend to only be about an Inch in total length and only a couple of millimetres in diameter (yeah, I know, I mixed my measurements, get off my case already…).  The external batteries I’m talking about below are a little bigger, but even they are typically not much bigger than 2-3 Inches long. Continue reading

Police Earpieces

There are a wide variety of Police Earpieces on the market, whether you need an Overt orCovert Earpiece, listen only or with Push To Talk (PTT) and Microphone, whether you want in ear or headset, D Shape, G Shape or Acoustic and choice is to be honest 100% personal preference! What I will do today is run over the basic pro’s and con’s of each type of police earpiece and their normal uses but ultimately you have to try a few different types and find what works for you.

With covert ear pieces you have a couple of options a wireless in ear receiver and hidden mic that runs to a minimum of £200 and probably more like £500 or the more common acoustic earpiece with clear coiled tube which will set you back anywhere between £12 and £20.  The clear tube runs out of the back of the wearers shirt collar and loops over the top of the ear and into the ear canal.  There are two options then for fitting the tube into the ear canal, either the standard “Mushroom Tip” which blocks the whole ear canal of the “Gel Earpiece Insert” that fits into the ear well to hold it in place and then a smaller tube runs into the ear canal allowing both clear transmission of comms without the earpiece completely cutting off ambient local sounds.  Acoustic Covert earpieces can have a 3 wire PTT and Mic allowing the mic to be lapel mounted or hidden in a sleeve or listen only.

G Shape police ear pieces fit like an inverted G made of black plastic or rubber, hooked over the top of the ear with the earpiece speaker coming down to the opening of the ear canal (some ear pieces have it swivel mounted others don’t).  General consensus is that the G shape earpiece is the most comfortable for the most users.

D Shape Police Earpieces (surprisingly enough) are black plastic or rubber D Shapes with the curve hooking round the back of the ear and the straight part running down the centre of the ear with the speaker mounted in the middle to align with the ear opening.  These do not fit as close to the ear as a G Shape earpiece and people with bigger ears may tend to find they flap about like Dumbo when running!!

Both D and G Shape earpieces are available in PTT and Mic or listen only and will normally set you back anywhere between £10 and £20.

Earpieceonline has the most common police radio earpieces are for Motorola MTH800 and CP040 Series, Sepura SRP 2000 series and a few models of Kenwood. Continue reading

How does bone conduction work?

Bone conduction headphones (commonly referred to as ‘Bonephones’) are actually really clever. In order to best explain how they work, I’ll need to take you on a journey into the Human ear…

No, not literally. That would be disgusting.

OK, so you know how sound travels through the air? Surely you must have done that science experiment at school where you hear sound disappearing into an airless vacuum? Yup, it’s just like that. Continue reading

Why are there many connectors for Icom earpieces?

The four different Icom earpiece connectors connect the earpiece in question to four different types of two-way radio or, at least, four different types of connector.

Generally, it is good advice to make absolutely sure that your chosen earpiece can connect with the radio you intend to use. Not all radios use the same fittings, which is why there are so many different types of connector available.

A straight pin connector, for example, works best when used on marine radios, but is also compatible with Maxon and Vertex radios. Another thing to take into account is the activity that the earpiece is going to be used for. If the user is going to be standing still for prolonged periods of time, then he/she may require a different type to the one that may be preferable if the user is going to be engaging in strenuous exercise.

Two-way radios are used in a great many distinct environments, including shopping centers, building sites, roadway maintenance, fleet and transport operations, shipping, factory floor work, security, healthcare, private transport and much more besides. Because of this, there are many different types of earpiece connectors.

The four available Icom earpiece connectors indicate the jobs that the compatible two-way radios were likely designed for. This does not necessarily mean that an Icom radio would be unsuitable for other work, just that it is probably particularly suited to a certain type of job.

The different connectors also have distinct methods of working, even though their basic external operations are usually indistinguishable from one another. Icom have gone to great lengths to make their earpieces among the best in the world. One way they have done this is by allowing the earpiece connectors for icom to be tailor made for specific tasks.

 

Why having a good set of headsets makes financially sense

Like a complete and total song nut (some might say ‘geek’) headsets are very important to me. The particular sounds we listen to from our headphone are exclusive to each aficionado of music. Some sort of a great, bass heavy sound from their headsets, while some favor their headphone developed for softer, further coherent, tones.

I of late broke my own set of headsets, I was making my way back home on a long train journey and my trusty headsets just died. Depressing. As items go, they are far more individual than most transportable belongings. headphone are the gadgets that provde the delight of the music you worship. Continue reading